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Company Overview

About Us

Founded in Hawaii in 1851, Dole Food Company, Inc., with 2010 revenues of $6.9 billion, is the world's largest producer and marketer of high-quality fresh fruit and fresh vegetables. Dole markets a growing line of packaged and frozen foods, and is a produce industry leader in nutrition education and research. The Company does business in more than 90 countries and employs, on average, 36,000 full-time, regular employees and 23,000 full-time seasonal or temporary employees, worldwide.
March 21, 2005 BY Dole Nutrition Institute

Go Bananas

Diets Rich in Potassium May Lower Stroke Risk
March 21, 2005

At just 110 calories each, bananas provide a good source of fiber, vitamin C, manganese and, of course, potassium. Those who consume diets rich in potassium are 50% less likely to have a stroke compared to their non-potassium consuming peers, according to a study recently published in Neurology. This mineral also fights high blood pressure and UCSF researchers found it may prevent osteoporosis in post-menopausal women.

The “b” in bananas reminds us they are an excellent source of vitamin B6, which according to Dr. Terry Shultz, a professor at Washington State University, has been shown to lower the risk of colon, prostate, lung, gastric and pancreatic cancers. These researchers speculate that the B6 may be b-hind banana’s anti-cancer benefits, by helping to inhibit DNA strand breaks.

Banana consumption has been linked to lower risk of leukemia, colorectal and kidneycancers. In fact, a study published in Nutrition and Cancer found that those who consumed bananas three or more times per week had a  lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to those who consumed them less than one time per week.

Bananas are also bursting with phytochemicals such as beta-sitosterol (lowers cholesterol) and dopamine.

No wonder bananas are the leading fresh fruit sold in the United States and the second leading fruit crop in the world. So yes, put a banana in your pocket — in your smoothie, on your cereal, in your lunchbox, even on your face (see this issue’s Dole Spa Recipe).